Revinar

Unlocking Content Workflow Efficiency with Rev + Dropbox



Webinar Transcription

Ryan Sweeney
Welcome, everyone, and those who are still joining to a very formal webinar. No, this is maybe marketed as a webinar. But we're going to try to keep this as a casual fireside chat in attempts to stray away from all the webinars that we're all participating in probably a little too often. So we're going to try to make this unique and exciting for you all. All right. So a few housekeeping items.

I mentioned, we can't see you, don't worry. There are live captions available on this fireside chat discussion. And you can make them available by clicking the closed caption button should be at the bottom of your screen.

And then show subtitle is how you would enable them and you should see them on the bottom of your screen or the bottom left hand corner of your screen. You can turn them on or off as you like, those are automated live captions. So there's a potential that they're not perfect. So please know that. We will send the recording of this conversation along with a 100% accurate transcript in the next couple days. So please look out for that. And we will have a Q&A, I believe you can ask questions throughout, we'll do our best to answer.

It may not be to the end, unless somebody has this mind blowing question that we just have to answer, which may happen, and I'm sure will, so please keep that in mind. So a little bit about what we are going to cover today. First off, my name is Ryan Sweeney. And I work with the partnerships team here at Rev. And it's my pleasure to be discussing unlocking content, workflow and efficiency with Rev and Dropbox with you today. So what we're going to cover, accessibility. What does that mean? What did it mean? What does it mean today? What will it mean? We're actually going to show a use case from Adam at Kaleidoscope pictures, how he uses Rev and Dropbox today, to do just that, to improve collaboration and speed up content development in today's world.

We'll go through a quick video of how Rev and Dropbox have started their marriage together from an integration perspective. So you get a real sense for what the workflow is between the two products. And then we'll have a discussion about just the future of remote collaboration. And we'll try not to be pie in the sky about it, we'll try to be really sort of clear about like, what does that mean? This is a mostly media and entertainment related discussion. So we'll keep it specific knowing that there's there's a lot of production folks that are listening in today. And everybody on the panel today has around the fire has a background in this space. So we're going to try to keep it really relevant. And then we'll go through the Q&A. So with that said, I will go ahead and introduce my fellow fireside chatters. First Andy Wilson from Dropbox. Andy, as opposed to me introducing your title and rolling them out, let you do it.

Andy Wilson
Fantastic look. Thanks very much, Ryan. Hi, everybody. I'm Andy from Dropbox. I look after media here at Dropbox. So I work with our product teams to look at how we're going to develop Dropbox product to really meet the workflows that creatives need all around the world. And I'm really pleased to be working with the team here at Rev. We've been working with them for some time now. We'll talk a little bit about that later on. To enable you to really, transform your content to get access to transcripts. And I think it's a fantastic partnership. I'm really excited about what we're going to be talking about today.

Ryan Sweeney
Thank you. And Adam Nielsen from Kaleidoscope Adam, I'll let you introduce yourself, sir.

Adam Nielson
Yeah. So I'm Adam Nielsen. I'm the Creative Director of branded experience over at Kaleidoscope. Our company is we do, we're broken up into four different divisions. So we do film, we do television, we do branded entertainment, along with what I do. So I'm just excited to be part of this team and be on this panel. So excited to talk with you all and just to give all of you a sense of what we do. We put together this reel and yeah, Ryan you want to play that?

Ryan Sweeney
Yes I will.

[Video plays]

Ryan Sweeney
That was beautiful, inspiring. And what a great diverse amount of work that you guys do.

Adam Nielson
Yeah, it's been really fun. We have a lot of great clients and yeah. Dropbox and Rev make it possible for us to do what we do so.

Ryan Sweeney
Cool. That's great.

Adam Nielson
Okay, yeah, let's talk about.

Ryan Sweeney
It's nice to hear for those who... and sorry, I didn't full screen that video, I did not mean to not do it justice. I just wasn't sure what that was going to do. So I will make sure that the audience has a full picture of that great work that you guys put together. And for those who are not feeling like this is a fireside chat. This should hopefully help that sink in. I won't labor on it for too long, but I shouldn't. 

Adam Nielson
That's a nerd.

Ryan Sweeney
Jacket. Right. Okay. All right. I'm going to go ahead and stop sharing my screen. And let's get into what we're going to talk about today. So really why are we here? This word accessibility. I always used to have this sort of not a negative connotation with accessibility, but there's always like a word like community that was overused. And I was like, I just don't, doesn't resonate for me in a way that I feel like, maybe it should. So I want to sort of pose this question to the group. What does accessibility mean to you? Adam, you first, what does that mean?

Adam Nielson
So we at Kaleidoscope, I think a lot of people think of accessibility as like that end result. Oh, it's a closed caption at the end, it's the subtitles at the end that allow people with certain abilities to interact with. But what we see we lean a lot more toward what Sarah Luevano talks about, where she says like, "Accessibility is more than just compliance at the end of a project, accessibility is at the heart of communications," the first thing you should think about, because it means thinking about your audience, it's what it really means to care about something deeply that you're going to go into whatever format the people that you're communicating need in order to understand.

And so for us, accessibility begins with transcripts. Oh, we did this great interview, we want to document it, how do we get this into the clients hands, our fellow collaborators hands, into the editors hands, so we can all look at this content together and start to shape it. It's not just left up to one person to dictate. Because you need all these different voices in order to make content that resonates with a lot of different people. So that's kind of our take on it. I don't know, what do you think Andy?

Andy Wilson
I think from my perspective, it's quite a few different things really, this idea of accessibility. So obviously, being a European, we have multiple different languages here. So we've always had subtitles or something that maybe makes the show that, I would have been working in my past or Ryan, or any of us really available in lots of different territories. So that accessibility of content into different markets is a really big thing. But I think over the last 12 months, the idea of accessibility to content means a very different thing. For all creatives, the idea of being able to actually access content remotely. That's been one of the biggest challenges, certainly of the production teams and the marketers and creators that I work with.

That's been a really large challenge. And in fact, we surveyed a number of agencies over in Australia, back in Australia in April last year. And then we did it again last night, and really asked them what their challenges were in terms of access. And everybody came back with the same thing, which is, it's large files. It's how can we get them? And how can we share them around the team to get our work done. So I think that's one of those accessibility points that not the traditional definition, but really digs into what is holding back teams today.

And then I think there's another side of it that we've seen as well. And I think, we've all adapted to the idea of through adversity, we've probably found new talent pools. And I think that's actually a really interesting development that we see today. And when I worked in broadcasting, we always talked about using the best talent from around the world. But there were always technological barriers put in place to kind of stop us from doing that. It was difficult to get the material to them, there were time zones, it was tricky. And now fast forward to 2021. And all those barriers have been removed, because we've all figured out how to do remote production, different ways, different approaches to it.

And so now, all of a sudden, that accessibility isn't just the content, it's the talent as well. And you can work with the best people in the world, and it doesn't matter, kind of where they are. And that means that proximity to LA or to London to Paris to New York, Toronto, actually isn't the paramount thing anymore. It's about really opening up the ability for talent to do things in amazing ways, wherever they are. And I think that's a really interesting approach to accessibility is work with the best people and open up new talent to production. So accessibility means an awful lot to us.

Ryan Sweeney
Yeah, and like I said, even more so today, because of what we've all been through the last year or, so right? We're, I think, trending in this direction, but it's all forced us in some good ways to really evaluate where is this talent and shouldn't really matter where they are? And if we can get them the tools to be as productive, and creative as possible, right? Yeah, the accessibility definition before, at least in the US, sort of, was a government led like initiative, a wheelchair ramp into a public building, right? So watching TV, watching CNN and having closed captions, so that the deaf or hard of hearing or non native English speakers, would have access to that sort of critical information.

Now, the government led that, but now it's every content creator, right, keeping that in mind, and really leading the way and according to the World Health Organization, about 500 million people in the world today are deaf or hard of hearing in some way. So we've come to understand that this is the right thing to do. But it's also is going to directly impact like the amount of views our content gets, right? Once it's published, the amount of engagement. And that's a more holistic definition of what this word means is even more relevant today, right? And Andy you... I'm sorry, Adam, you guys at Kaleidoscope have a pretty awesome way in which you not only communicate with your colleagues and those you collaborate with, but you have a mechanism you guys have created that is sort of thing, these technologies in a way that I think is just really awesome. I don't know, maybe want to talk about that a little bit.

Adam Nielson
Yeah. So, I really like from a personal standpoint, I have two deaf siblings. So I grew up with closed captions and subtitles and all that. So I have that experience on my side. But I think there's such a beauty to having the tools that Dropbox and Rev have that allows to tell more authentic stories. I think that's one of the tricks is to always keep authenticity like throughout the whole creative the content creation process. So I wanted to show you what we do, give you a few use cases. And if you guys have any questions, feel free to ask.

Let's see here. Okay, can you see my screen? My Chrome browser? Okay, great. So I can't take credit for everything. We have a big team, we create a lot together and in our own little groups. But, yeah, let me take you on this little tour. So one of our use cases is that we will do preliminary Zoom calls with people as we start to research projects. We'll do these Zoom interviews. This was with a man by the name of Dave, his great, we brought our creative team in, interviewed him, got his insights into how he approaches this subject.

And one of the things that we wanted to do is like, hey, how do we get this out of just, "Oh, the three people on the Zoom call." And so what we did is, we set up a Dropbox paper, and in it, you can click on this Rev link and interact with it. Which was huge for us as content creators, but also to be able to send out to other stakeholders. So they can go through and hear the excitement, look for those keywords, as we're starting to scope out this content.

But we also know that there's a lot of people inside of the creative process. For this particular project, we had not just the video team, but we had marketers, we have architects, they are engineering the experience for the people that are going to eventually be consuming this content. And so we went through and actually took the transcript and created this medium article that could then be shared out. So it's a little, here's the taste. If you want to you can go into the Rev transcript, and watch the whole thing, it's great, but it's not like, "Hey, here are the highlights."

And that has been huge for us to be able to communicate just beyond like, "Hey, here's our hours and call," into having it anchor us throughout the creation of this content. Okay, so that's one way that we use it. Another way that we use it, this is a project that one of the partners at Kaleidoscope pictures uses. Name's Russ Kendall. He uses this Rev transcripts. So we do a music show where we interview music artists, the drummer from Neon Trees, interviews them, and they'll do like a half hour interview. And we'll need to turn that down into two, three minutes, five minutes segment. So really 10 minutes total. And in order to maintain that authenticity, because we want everything to be authentic, we want it to be true. And the transcripts are key for us. So what we'll do is we'll take that full transcript, and then we'll do an edit.

And then we'll run that edit through the automated transcription tool. So here, let me just bring it up. And what it does, is it brings up this transcript not always like, perfect, but what it lets us do is we can look at this, and say, okay, it's falling apart a little bit here. Let's go to the full transcript, and we can actually go in and live at it, like sticking those bits that we want in until we get a full piece. And this is really great. It goes beyond just using let's say your typical comments in the video, like, "Hey, this parts a little rough." Instead, it actually lets us stick things in and see how they work together. So that's been huge for us as well, yeah.

So I could even talk about all sorts of things with... I'll just mention one more little thing that we've really like doing. And that's with our deliverables. So subtitles and captions are all important, right? I don't want to like bypass that. But what we'll do is we'll create a little dashboard for all the videos that we're delivering with a project. This is a project that we did had multiple deliverables, I think we ended up with 80 something video, all across the board. What's important to our client is to maintain brand across those different deliverables. And so what was great is using Dropbox paper, along with Dropbox, where we can host all the links and stuff and people could go in, the client could go in, click on the Rev link, and then I preloaded this for our viewing convenience.

So the client could come into the Rev document, and edit. And what this allowed them to do was to make sure that everything was unified, any branding, trademarking anything like that. One thing that's really important to us is that everybody's name is correct. And rather than having a bunch of files made by a bunch of different people, or whatnot, Rev allows us to really centralize those files like, "Hey, we just need to caption at once, get the punctuation, right once, the name was right once. And it is filters throughout. We can get the subtitles, we can get the captions all in that one spot. So it doesn't really matter. [crosstalk 00:22:03] He's from India, we've got like animation pieces. And it just all comes together in a really beautiful way. And it's really great having that client be able to say, "Hey, we made those changes, let's get all the deliverables made." So, yeah, just a little brief run through of a few things that we didn't want on our side.

Andy Wilson
It's pretty amazing. Adam just from my... I love the organization that you guys have brought to it, how do your clients find that?

Adam Nielson
They really like it. So it's really streamlined our processes, because we can act with more confidence, like we got it right. And also, that not only did we get the captions right, the subtitles right, but those little bits of creativity. Those little voices have being able to look at a transcript and have not just one person's bias take over to be able to have multiple people say, "Oh, my gosh, I loved this part." To be able to have five people say, "Hey, we love this." How can we keep that authenticity throughout? What can we do to make sure that this interview holds that authentic perspective throughout? So, yeah.

Ryan Sweeney
It's not so siloed. It's really truly collaborative from the inception process through. When you're filmmaking of any kind, scripted or non, you're figuring out as you go, right? A lot of the time you have an idea what the story is, right? But in the best films the story is revealed to you by great scenes that are shot that you didn't anticipate or things in interviews that you didn't necessarily think you were going to capture, right? And I think it's awesome to see that all that laid out. And honestly, I didn't even when Andy and I even started talking about or Dropbox and Rev started to sort of like, think about what a collaboration would look like.

I didn't even think about ways in which you were already leveraging both technologies. It just goes to show that one, you're resourceful, and smarter than us. But there is a need for this kind of organization. And back to that word accessibility. It also made me think when you're going through the transcript. Accessibility is also just about search, right? Search, in terms of, it's so easy to create, to capture so much content, right? We've got the ability on every single device that we carry in our backpack or our pocket, our camera bag, and so that knowledge and that voice that is constantly being captured, right? It's got to be stored, right? Your colleagues got to see it. But it's got to be findable, right? And there's probably a lot of content that even a small to medium production company may have captured over the years that is seemingly sort of not relevant but that really could be repurposed, should this kind of organization in this kind of search ability exists, right?

So it's also a way for us to figure out how to get creative when we are our project are sidelined, right? This one particular show is not going to go into production, because the limitations around COVID are too high right now or whatever, right? But you have a client who might need something, and you go, "You know what," actually, we may have content from something else that we've done as a company that we can access easier and share and come to some consensus about whether we can use or not just by having that kind of searchable, accessible aspect of this, right? That made sense.

Adam Nielson
Yeah. Well, I think it's that search ability, one of the things that we really like, is we use Dropbox. I use Dropbox paper a lot, just because of how visual it is, and how it can hold, it can really work as this broadcast point, because a lot of times you need to bring in a lot of resources to tell the stories that are going to impact people. Because it's not just in the world of endless content, you need to be more pragmatic about your content. You need to have it be stronger and more substantial on ways to other pieces of content. And so, that means using a lot of diverse tools, and Dropbox has really helped us just kind of bring those all together to where... Oh, using Dropbox paper, we can centralize this broadcast out to people, and content creators.

Andy Wilson
So I really love the way you've created that living document with a client. I think that's a really interesting approach where you've got kind of a complete ability to access to see as you say, you've organized it very well. But that ability to go back and forth really easy. And if you haven't, if anybody on the session hasn't used Dropbox paper you can use it, it's free, it's on Dropbox.com, [inaudible 00:27:51] you can get access to it.

And yeah, I think you've done a really interesting thing there in terms of bringing everything to life in different ways. I'm really interested with that medium example that you showed us about how does the crime tool, because you're really taking that content and kind of extending it to life across so many different outputs and outlets. It's a really interesting way to change the lens there saying, "Hey, look, we've got this content. We've got amazing transcripts, it's a great story. Let's put it in [crosstalk 00:28:21]." Let's use the video, let's think about how we can do audio. I've really loved that. Is that something that you guys are trying out for the first time now? Or have you been doing that for a while?

Adam Nielson
So it's pretty new. It's a new concepts that we just started. And we're actually taking it to the next level. Because one of the things that we realized is we do these interviews, and sometimes, maybe they're not completely applicable to maybe a project that we're going on. And so we're like, how do we share this with other content creators. And so now we're taking these interviews that we're doing, and not only putting them on medium, but also starting our own content with a company we're calling [Tytos 00:57:35], that introduces new people to new collaborators. So it's been huge for us, stepping back to...

The client will always have their opinion, but I kind of end up in the selfish mentality. It's so good for me, two months into a project to look at content, be like okay, this edit, what can make it better. And then the go to this article, and kind of just browse through it, remember it and be like, "Oh, yes, this thing." This is how we bring in this element because this is what the audience wants. This is what the people need.

Ryan Sweeney
So yeah, especially over Zoom, overall, this idea of Zoom fatigue and stuff and we've got to find different ways of capturing moments that we feel are going to be useful in our project, right? And it's really easy to sort of like, just disassociate the human connection, right? When it's constantly on Zoom, so that transcription in some way, and really the way you guys are doing it.

Transcription and Dropbox is just part of the how, but what you guys have created is like the real, tangible, usable document that continues to inspire you. And then of course, gets your client really excited. And then like I said, other ways of utilizing that content to connect people and to create it and to have a voice with audiences around the world, from Kaleidoscope to an audience directly, right? There's content that you have, that you think is relevant to people that just like your work right, aside from the client so.

Adam Nielson
Yeah, well, Ryan, I know you mentioned like the Zoom fatigue. And sometimes, it's just so nice to print out a transcript, and go for a walk, it's just nice. It's that idea of when you shift environment, you gain new insight. And sometimes it's just so helpful to print something out and be in a new environment, and then experience it. Oh, I don't have to be in front of the screen. And we found that to be really beneficial as well.

Ryan Sweeney
All the little things that we're we're thinking about these, right? [crosstalk 00:31:54] They make a big difference.

Adam Nielson
Yeah, they are.

Ryan Sweeney
Cool. I think I'm going to show a little bit about how we have made this connection with Dropbox possible, I still have the fire going. This is, I think, will be helpful for the audience to see just exactly like, this is not In my opinion, Andy, tell me what you think. But I think this is sort of the beginning of how Rev and Dropbox are going to continue to collaborate. And we'll talk about kind of how things got started between the two companies where this inspiration came from.

But I'll go ahead and just show the first step and how we're trying to make it easy for creatives to manage their transcription and captioning process while using Rev and Dropbox. Because we have a lot of the same customers that were sort of working in like disparate parts. There wasn't that sort of joint connection that we thought would just, hey, removing that step will just make their life easier, right? So I'm going to share this video. It is about three minutes. So to the audience that has a short attention span. We were not as trailer driven as Kaleidoscope but I think taking a look at the nuts and bolts of just sort of how this works from a practical workflow perspective will be helpful. So I'm going to go ahead and get start that. Hi, everyone, and this was actually done by one of our product managers that that worked directly on the integration. So you're hearing from the horse's mouth.

Integration Video Speaker
Today I'm going to be walking you through how to link and use the Rev extension for Dropbox. The first step to linking is to navigate to Dropbox.com/apps. Once you arrive at this page, you can search for Rev. After that, you will be redirected to be Rev page where you can learn more about the app, as well as Rev as a company itself. From here you can like learn more.

Learn more when we do to a Rev page that goes through how to link the accounts, how to use the extension and how to unlink the accounts. Or we focused on the first step for now which is linking the accounts. In order to do this one should navigate to Rev.com. Once you're on Rev.com, you can either sign in or create an account. I've already signed into my personal account to save some time in this demo. But once you do that, you can click here on your name you'll see a drop down. After doing so click on settings.

In settings, you can click on my integrations here on the left side. After that, you can link account, select Dropbox from the drop down, click link account. If you're already signed in, all it will do is ask you to grant Rev.com permissions to your Dropbox. If you're not, you will have to sign into your Dropbox account. So it looks like I was already signed in. So I'll click allow. Now the app has been installed on your Dropbox account and linked to Rev.com. In order to actually use the app, navigate to Dropbox com or you can also access this to the Dropbox desktop application.

So in your files, either home or the files page, you can hover over one of the items that we accept. So this would be an mp4 or any other type of commonly accepted media to Rev up that you can click more open, you'll see Rev.com here on the right side. After you do that, you will be redirected to a page on Rev.com where you can select your service line. So you can select transcript, automated transcript, caption or subtitle, the purpose of this video, let's like caption.

Okay, so now you will be placed into the caption checkout flow. On this page, you can select any add ons. So let's like burn then captions, so I want to pay more for that. Then select checkout. From here, you'll be redirected to the payment details page where you can pay with any saved payment methods or use a different card, select order captions. And your order is complete. You will then receive an email with additional follow ups about your captions order. So Dropbox extension, as I said works for all of our service lines. All features for all the service lines will be available because they do use the standard checkout.

Ryan Sweeney
Should be pretty clear.

Andy Wilson
Yeah, I think so.

Adam Nielson
Yeah, it was.

Ryan Sweeney
Andy, may I ask you, when you first met Rev, what was the thought process on the Dropbox side, knowing your customers, specifically media that you oversee? What are some of the challenges and trends that you've been seeing that helps sort of formulate this idea?

Andy Wilson
Yeah, I mean, I think it was really great. We met just after Adobe Max 2019. So we were there announcing our Dropbox transfer feature. And I think it was a really interesting meeting of minds and really great focus on creatives. And in essence, allowing creatives to just think about their workflow and get work done faster. I'm so proud that we kind of, we dug in really quickly over the last year to get this put in place, and to really help support those users to get content transcribed really fast. Because I think that we just made it a little bit simpler. And what was really interesting as we were starting to talk about workflow and creatives wanting to go out where they're recording podcasts, whether they're shooting social content, where they're making kind of feature length films, but like Adams teams are.

As well as shorter web content. People want to get those interviews transcribed as quickly as possible. They're looking at every way they can optimize the process. And when we started looking, and hearing about the volume of Dropbox links that have been shared with Rev to get that work done, it's like, we've got to bring these two products closer together, we've got to make it easier for the users to make that happen. And that's what we're really, really focused on is just, how can we make it as slick as quick and as easy for our end users, our shared customers to get their creative work done. And as we've seen with Adam, those customers then will then take that to the next level, they'll create those orders in paper that their customers go in and see every single version of it.

I think that's what's been really interesting for us, but also just working on the relationship with Rev, where you guys really get the challenges. And you know where the pain points are for your customers, for those creatives. And we can be really focused on solving those workflow challenges. I think that's where a great partnership comes together. And that's what we're really pleased to be working with you guys.

Ryan Sweeney
Thanks. Yeah, I think we're really trying. We're trying to understand our customers better every day. And we admit that we don't know everything that they're going through, right? We're not spending all of our time producing content, the way that they are. But we are spending all of our time trying to provide them the best possible captions and transcripts and subtitles, and a natural evolution for us is just to connect to more places that they are, right? So nothing, rocket science, but it's definitely.

Especially after the last year and the onus on remote work and collaborating with your teams. It's just awesome to see a real life example of Adam and his group and how he merges those two together and leverages both of these technologies. So we've got about 15 minutes left, and if I think one question that I am asking myself, I think Rev is asking too, and we're all probably asking is, where is this going? How we've made some adjustments, in terms of our content workflow, and how we're managing remotely, how we're repurposing content, how we're being extra creative in this new world. But where do we see the next year or two with regard to how will evolve further? Now, what you guys decide to answer that first.

Adam Nielson
You want to go first Andy or me?

Andy Wilson
I'm going to let you go first. Because I want to here from the person making kind of beautiful content.

Adam Nielson
Oh, yeah. So there's so many things we could talk, we're going to have a whole another session about this. But where we feel it's going as a group is, we now have, because of the pandemic, I think more people are inside of a similar context, where it's like, oh, we've got to work remotely. Which has also added the ability to, "Oh, I can work with different people." Rather than gravitating toward our own, maybe in person networks, we're actually able to transcend those. And that's really beautiful, because you're bringing in new voices, you're going beyond yourself, and maybe the context that you're in.

And so I think that's one of the big things, Rev being able to translate is huge for us to be able to like, "Hey, we're going to send you an interview, can you subtitle this," and then I can give that over to an editor or we can cut it together. And maybe somebody that only knows English, they can sit back, listen to it, watch those subtitles, and like, "Oh, I like where this story is headed." There's that opportunity. And we see it too, expanding out your network, hopping on LinkedIn, and reaching out to the person that added you and talking with them.

So that's one of the things that we're doing with Kaleidoscope is that you can go to Kaleidoscope, sign up for a subscription. And every week, you're going to get introduced to some new conversation, some new collaborator, and it's all possible because of Rev and Dropbox. Being able to take that interview, just like I showed, and edit it down, make a piece of content so that you can learn, "Oh, I never knew that people collaborated this way."

What does it look like when somebody collaborates with someone that they don't normally collaborate with. And introducing people so they can get new ideas, new creators to join forces with them. So that's one of our passion projects and something that we're doing. And we're launching that on March 10. All because of what you guys have all done, you gave us tools, I think to differentiate ourselves inside of the space. So yeah, that's my meandering. Here's some of the future. So yeah, anyway, what do you think, Andy?

Andy Wilson
What do I think? I think over the last two years, we've seen an explosion in video. I think that's something from a Dropbox side, we've seen huge growth in video. And I think that goes to tell the story of the growth of social media, the growth of individual storytelling, I think an incredible growth of creativity out there, not just for individuals, but for businesses as well and finding new ways to connect with their customers and their audiences. And I think that's probably one of the most exciting things that's happening in the world right now is to the accessibility point, content has never been more accessible in your hand on the move, but also, pretty much everything's captioned, because social media means that you're not going to have your sound on.

So you've just got this word that has become incredibly accessible to everybody. And I think that's just really changing the way that we think about that, you might be in bed and your partner's asleep, and you're watching that funny clip, but you don't really want to wake them up. So you just don't have the captions and sound off. I think we've all kind of done that. Been in that moment. But I think the real winner here is creativity. Because it means that if you're starting out in industry, and you've got a great idea, or you've got an amazing pitch, you don't have to always go down the same route, you can choose a very different way to get your ideas made.

And we're building tools to help you to do the production side of that. So improving our seem to get those large files up, preview videos, up to huge sizes. 150 gig within Dropbox has some things we're really working on with our creative tools to make that happen. But now's a great time to be a creative because you put together the right tools, revenue and Dropbox, and the passion to tell stories that really matter. And then that's what I think the last 12 months have really driven through is people have become much more passionate about getting their stories out there. And that's what creatives do.

They'll always find a way. And it's great to have platforms like Dropbox, like Rev that help them to do that. So obviously, resilience is also an important part of that too, to keep going to have the courage to keep going in difficult times. But I think for me, that's the thing that I've been most excited about is really just seeing the growth of ideas and just the drive people to get them out there.

Ryan Sweeney
Well said, couldn't agree more. We have a lot of questions that have come through, but I wanted to pick a couple that I thought would be most relevant. One actually, Andy, on your coattails there. What are some other features I think this question means up Dropbox that you guys are working on that may not be obvious to Dropbox users, either because they're not in your website all day long, or you guys haven't indicated yet or whatever, specific to this industry, what are some other things you guys are doing that would might be relevant?

Andy Wilson
I think there's kind of three things that are caught out today that I haven't spoken about already. One, is good for request. That's something you may not know about. And that's the ability inside Dropbox to request content from a collaborator, from a creator that you're working with. And it just, you set up a folder to point it to and it sends them an email, they don't need a Dropbox account, they can drop their content in there. So whether it's an audio interview, video clips, promo photos themselves. It's a really easy way to get content without having to think about sending a hard drive, or getting them to put it in an FTP or anything like that, it's just really easy. Send them a follow request, you grab it, you know where it is, even pings you when they've uploaded the file. So that's really useful creative tool number one.

Number two is Dropbox transfer, which kind of is the other side of that. So if I want to send my delivery to my client, I can use Dropbox to transfer it. And again, they don't need a Dropbox account, you can send up to 100 gig in a transfer. So it's really huge. And you can send those final deliverables. And if you have our creative tools add on, you can add up to 250 gig on there. So you talk about serious sized kind of video content, very high risk content there. And it makes it really easy. So if it's synced in Dropbox, there's no upload time either it's just right click send via transfer, because it's synchronized. It's really, really fast.

So those are two things that I think are really exciting at the moment for us. And then the final one is we've added frame accurate commenting as well to our videos. So if you want to get that remote review and approve worked on, that's something that we brought into the product with our creative tools, features. Because again you can't sit in the edit suite next to each other anymore. So if I need to get that feedback, if Adam needs that in detail feedback about, can you just change feedback a little bit earlier, can we come out of the shot a bit earlier, maybe three frames earlier, you can make that comment from your laptop, iPad, wherever, it's a very simple way of doing it. So I think those are some of the exciting creative features that we've shipped recently.

Ryan Sweeney
I was just thinking about that in terms of the commenting and the collaboration, it also feels like maybe you guys are could even go down the path of enabling some kind of a editing tool within Dropbox as well, right? Because you've got the files, you've got the transcripts, you've got the time codes, right? There's what I'm seeing in the market also is this emergence of these technologies that are making it easier for people to edit content. I did study film and I did spend hours in the editing lab, on final cut and like... but now everybody has that, wants to be a storyteller or that isn't storyteller, right? And these tools do this too to get a rough cut of something, especially a non scripted piece faster than it would be than normal, right? So to me, it feels like there's this great momentum happening within Dropbox for customers like Kaleidoscope that are storing, searching, commenting, and then potentially even getting that that sort of first edit even faster, right?

Andy Wilson
Yeah, we definitely see that today. We've got some really strong partnerships with the likes of Adobe for Adobe Premiere Rush, where Dropbox is natively integrated into it. But also with online editors like Clip Jam, and We Video, where again, you can pull your content from Dropbox, and it'll pull it straight into the editor, and then you can start cutting straight away. And that you're exactly right, Ryan, it's like this is how, this is the time where those partnerships as integrations can really help people to make the most of their content to kind of take it on its journey to clip it, to make that quick part and then to pop it back into Dropbox and share it with the commissioner, share it with the exact for sign off. It's a really, really exciting time to be working in content production, because it just feels like all the tools are coming to that point where it's getting really mature and really exciting to get content made.

Ryan Sweeney
I totally agree. Another question about for Rev just quickly sort of the difference. A lot of terminology that like automated transcription versus like human transcription, like what does that really mean? And for those who don't know, automated transcription is completely computer generated. In Revs case, like what you're seeing on the closed captions, or if you order our automated transcription through our website, it's Revs automated engine that is creating that. And that was fine tuned to be as accurate as possible and improving every day, because of the large data set that we have on the human transcription side, which is what you order when you need that transcript to be almost 100% perfect, we say 99% Plus, because there's always certain things that don't, that might be misspelled, or misunderstood.

So Adam you know, if you have a ton of raw footage, that you need to quickly search, then you might use the automated transcript. And if you need, one hour long video that is like a big focus, and you get the human transcription, because you're going to share that to more people or to the client, for example. And then obviously, the captions are also have that sort of near perfect accuracy. So humans are involved when it needs to be really accurate, machines aren't quite there yet. But we are working on supplying our customers with both depending on what their turnaround team, their sort of budget is for each project.

Adam Nielson
And I would just add to both tools are fantastic. When you pair them together, just going back to our illustration, we use that human transcription for the beginning of the interview. And then as we rapidly edit, using the automated it's just instantaneous, so that not only can the editor like, "Hey, here's the clip for you to review." But also, here's the automated transcript so that the creative director can say, "Okay, I'm seeing this, we need to add this in." So it's even more authentic to the original interview. Because editing is always about shrinking things down, while still maintaining authenticity. We're never going to invent something, we want it to be authentic, and we want to stick. And so the automated transcription has been huge for us to just give everybody the tool so they can give the best feedback possible.

Ryan Sweeney
Thank you for clarifying that in your Kaleidoscope example. I think that's helpful because I know there can be confusion around what each one does, right? And the creative at the end of the day just wants to get it out fast. And they want it to be accurate. They want it as soon as possible. So yeah, well, I want to thank both you guys for joining me around this wonderful fire. It's been a pleasure to speak with you and if you have any parting words or anything that you feel the audience might benefit from hearing, I pass it to you before we close out.

Andy Wilson
Well, maybe I'll go first thing, because just for those of you who were wondering about whether there's a Dropbox offering for you guys, I think that was in the year, right? Well, that absolutely is. So you will be emailed a discount code, which will come through to your email, probably in the next couple of days. And that will give you 25% of a Dropbox plus license if you are new subscribers. So watch out for that email come through, and that will give you your personalized code. But otherwise, I think, my one bit of advice is always think about how you can build the best creative team possible, bringing together talent from anywhere, and then give them the tools that they can really use to help them do their job like Dropbox and rest. So that'll be my one takeaway is, think about where the talent is, give people the best tools and go have some fun.

Adam Nielson
Yeah, I think just my closing thought is because of what Rev and Dropbox has done, I've been with you since the beginnings of both companies, the tools that you've provided, have just allowed us to expand our creativity. And so it's really great. So not to get all gushy, but thanks. I think, and if anybody has any questions about things that we're doing, feel free to find me on LinkedIn, more than happy to answer any of your questions or I've shared some examples from different members of my team. So happy to point you to them, so you can get more in depth about how we use Rev and Dropbox, but also how we tell stories.

And if you want to find out more about these collaborators, and individuals that we're finding and interviewing, feel free to reach out to me and I can point it to them. So there's so much talent, and there's so much brilliant insight about audiences and people because in the end, we're just creating content for people. People need to understand things, they need to feel things. And yeah, it's been great creating content for them. So with the tools that you have, yeah. Thanks.

Ryan Sweeney
Well, thanks gentlemen. Have a wonderful rest of your day, Andy, good night to you in London. Thanks for staying up late. We appreciate the conversation and I'm sure there'll be more to come.