Webinar

Accommodating Diverse Learners in Hybrid Education with Rev + Prezi


Join us as Sara Ciskie, Sales and Enablement Manager at Rev, chats with Prezi's Teacher in Residence, Paul Teske, in a live discussion about how to consider all learning styles in the new era of hybrid learning.


Webinar Transcription

Sara Ciskie:
Hello, everyone. So excited to meet all of you. Really cool to see all of the different places chiming in. I saw Tunisia, New Zealand, Spain, Canada, Pennsylvania, all these awesome places. Few other folks in Austin, Texas, as well, shameless plug for Austin. So exciting to meet everyone. Just a few quick housekeeping items before we get started.


Sara Ciskie:
So, first of all, everyone here who's, as a participant, is in viewing mode. So that means that your video is off and you're muted. So if you woke up feeling like you had a bad hair day, like I did, all is well. No one can see you, all good there.


Sara Ciskie:
Second item is that we encourage y'all to ask questions in the chat. We also have a Q&A function as well. We will have an opportunity for questions at the end, so feel free to pop those into the chat as we go through.


Sara Ciskie:
And then lastly, we do have live captions on that are being done by Rev's super smart speech-to-text, and we will also send a full transcript in the follow-up email. So if you go into your settings down at the bottom of your Zoom screen, you are able to turn those on and see the live captions as we go through. So we'll be talking a little bit about how text can help in video environments, so feel free to turn those on and engage with us that way as well.


Sara Ciskie:
So a few quick intros. Hello, everyone. I'm so excited to meet y'all virtually. My name is Sara Ciskie. I oversee Sales Enablement here at Rev. So that means that I work with ongoing training and development and onboarding for all the new sales reps that we have here at Rev. I've been at the company for, I think it'll be six years in March, but obviously who's counting? Love working at Rev, and I also love living in sunny Austin, Texas, which November is a good time of year here, so happy to be here today.


Sara Ciskie:
And then Paul, I'll flip over to you real quick.


Paul Teske:
Hi everyone, I'm Paul Teske. I'm a teacher-in-residence at Prezi. I'm also a consultant and I do adjunct professoring at the University of Washington in Seattle. Pleased to be here.


Sara Ciskie:
Awesome. Awesome. So before we get started and jump into the content of what we'll be talking about today, I know we have a couple of poll questions that we're going to pose to everyone, so I'll have our Rev admin pop those up. And then thank you for everyone who's chiming in the chat. It's so cool to see people from Greece and Italy. That's so awesome.


Sara Ciskie:
So the first question is around, "Which of the following best relates to the industry in which you work?" So K-12, higher education, business, or e-learning. I'm give you a few moments to respond there.


Sara Ciskie:
If none fit, that's completely fine. If none of them really are a perfect fit or if you don't want to respond, that's completely fine. Obviously we didn't want to have too exhaustive of a list.


Paul Teske:
K-12 is kindergarten through 12th grade here in the States.


Sara Ciskie:
Yeah. Awesome. Very cool. Thanks y'all for responding there. So I see, we have a lot of folks from higher ed, but we do have a lot represented in K through 12 education as well, which Paul's point is very, probably more of an American nomenclature. Awesome.


Sara Ciskie:
And I think we have one more poll question that we'll be popping up right here. Awesome. "How are you currently providing students with access learning options?" So it can be recorded sessions, transcripts of lessons, captioned videos, all of these or none of them.


Sara Ciskie:
Awesome. Great. Well, happy to see lots of different selections here. So some folks are doing captioning. I see a lot of people are recording. 30% of people are recording, or doing more than that. I see a lot of all of the above as well. Very cool. Thank you guys for going through that with us. So we're now going to jump into what we'll be covering in this session today.


Sara Ciskie:
So, first of all, we'll be talking about how virtual meetings and learning sessions are impacting education as a whole. We'll also be covering how you can drive comprehension of content and really understanding everything that we're presenting to our learning populations.


Sara Ciskie:
Next is effectively using video in an online environment. I'm sure it's no secret that video has become so important in the learning environment today. It's obviously how we're doing this webinar right now, right? So sort of a meta moment there.


Sara Ciskie:
Also, encouraging collaboration, especially in virtual and hybrid environments and really getting all the learners involved. And then finally, a wrap up Q&A session with Paul and myself. So very excited to jump in with y'all.


Sara Ciskie:
So to start, Rev and Prezi, we work together to gather a bunch of data around the current state of virtual meetings and how those have impacted the education landscape and really taken over and become a part of the forefront of what the education experience looks like in 2021. So we're going to review what some of those findings look like with y'all.


Sara Ciskie:
So, first of all, again, no secret, there are a lot of virtual meetings. There's a lot of virtual collaboration. A lot of things are happening in online environments, especially for classrooms, where we have many classrooms that are either still fully online or have gone to more of a hybrid environment. And I'm sure I don't have to tell y'all that virtual classroom settings or meetings often increase the temptation to multitask. 86% of education respondents admit to multitasking during meetings.


Sara Ciskie:
All of a sudden, and I am speaking for myself here too, I'm guilty of this as well, all of a sudden in a virtual meeting, laundry, dishes, household chores can become even more tempting. And you also lose this idea of space, so classroom spaces are really wonderful and it's a very curated space where there's minimal distractions, though obviously none. Whereas in a virtual environment, we're surrounded by distractions; pets, kids, traffic noises, not to mention the distractions of social media, news, et cetera. So all of this can equate to less engaged learners who have trouble engaged with the content, and this can also equate to meeting fatigue, which makes it really hard to bring our full attention and engagement to the table in a given session.


Sara Ciskie:
25% of folks say that they always or very frequently record their virtual meetings, often to try and combat this. I know that for a lot of folks, we experience what's soft called Zoom fatigue, of feeling the pressure of watching ourselves as we go through our various meetings and classroom sessions.


Sara Ciskie:
So we think it's good to talk about how we can teach a variety of learners. So we talk about frequently internally, what we call of the VARK model. So the VARK model represents our visual learners, auditory learners, those who like to consume information, reading and writing out, and then those who need some kind of interaction or kinesthetic learners. And how can we give learners different mechanisms with which they can engage with the material and make it more of a dynamic experience?


Sara Ciskie:
So the simple act of providing the text of a video session can immediately make the class more dynamic for each of these different learner types. Really bringing together the video and text of a class allows learners to engage with the content in ways that they wouldn't be able to engage with the video or the text alone.


Sara Ciskie:
So, first of all, transcribing session content provides a textual guide for every important piece of a lecture, meeting, or training. And then for readers and writers, they really thrive when they're taking notes, but often miss information, that having a transcript or having the text of a meeting or a classroom session can really, really help with.


Sara Ciskie:
Then for auditory learners, there's the ability to go back and relisten to the video session and having the text as well can help with that. And then finally, kinesthetic learners can use transcripts to create flashcards or other kinds of interactive means to learn, which help them really absorb what was taught and really engage with the material more fully.


Sara Ciskie:
And with that, I am going to transition over to Paul to talk about the community of inquiry model.


Paul Teske:
Yes. But first, there's one thing that I want to mention to folks. If you want to see us a little bit larger, rather than in this panel view, go up to the top in your Zoom and click view and then speaker, and then who's ever speaking will be more prominent on your screen. You can see the graphics and that sort of thing. It will help you out a lot.


Paul Teske:
And then I also have two questions for you. The first is, if you want to pop that up, our Rev admin, it is, "Have you ever created a video to support instruction? Yes or no?" This will be interesting because video can be used in a variety of ways. Let's go in, give us your yes or no. Be interesting to see the results. Maybe it will be overwhelmingly yes.


Paul Teske:
All right, let's do the reveal. There we go, 80% yes. 20%, maybe we'll convert you over by the end of this.


Paul Teske:
Okay. Now let's go on to question two. Let's post up question two. "Have you used video at all in your classroom and how so?" How have you used it? Lecture, instructional content, in an online course, a study guide, test review for school or department messages, maybe community messages, or none of the above?


Paul Teske:
I know back when I was in school, the way that they used video was you read a book and then you got to watch the video, and that was about it. So things have changed a lot in those 20 years.


Paul Teske:
Let's see what the results are for that one. Oh, lecture primarily, online courses, study guides, maybe about a 3% ...


Paul Teske:
Online courses. Study guides, maybe about a 3%, 6% for school and departmental messages. So that's really interesting. Okay. Thanks so much.


Paul Teske:
All right, let's move on now to talk about the community of inquiry model. Now, the community of inquiry model comes out of a group of researchers in Canada who started this about 20 years ago. They wanted to know what made for engaging online courses. And so they started picking it apart and they looked at surveys of students and engagement, and their satisfaction with courses. And they came up with three elements. Now, these elements, I don't think are earth shattering, because if you're a classroom teacher, you have to sort of think about these things naturally as part of what you do. However, once you go to an online environment, sometimes it can be a little bit, I don't know, there's certain things that are missing.


Paul Teske:
So the first step is instructional presence. That's you as the instructor. What are you teaching? How are you teaching it, et cetera? Next is cognitive presence. What are you having them do? Are they grappling with things at all? Is the content good? Are they engaging with it in certain ways? And then this third one, and this is the one that's often missing, is social presence. It's about classroom culture, and how do you engage your students in building belongingness and feeling like they want to be there? And this can hold true for university settings, as well as K-12. And in that in between space, you have things like supporting discourse between the social and the cognitive. And between the social and the instructional, you have things like setting the proper climate. And between instructional and cognitive, you have selecting the proper content.


Paul Teske:
So with all of these, video can play a role and it can be a really helpful role. And a lot of the work that I've been doing at Prezi from the beginning was looking at videos that were coming in, especially as the pandemic hit. And it was really interesting to see how teachers were using the materials and how they were engaging their students and making them feel at ease, and dealing with their social emotional needs.


Paul Teske:
Okay. So a lot of the different types of instructional videos have come to light too. So there's the delivery of content. We've talked about that a bit. But there's also reading to students. And we saw a lot that during the pandemic with kindergarten teachers reading books to students online. They were reviewing content with them so the students could go back and take a look at things and what was discussed, let's say, in a Zoom call. They were priming classroom discussions. They would show a video that they made and then put it out there. And oftentimes they made them rather than found something generic on YouTube, which was great. It really made it their own. And then they would also build community through it. They would provide global feedback, and oftentimes they would make school announcements as well. All of these are super duper great ways to use video and engage and communicate with the community that you're trying to build.


Paul Teske:
Okay, but this also shifts practice. It does. Because suddenly there's not just one of you, there's more than one of you. You have a polyphonous voice. And what this allows you to do is be able to be in more than one place at one time because it's recorded. And that can aid you in differentiation when you have different sets of students with different needs, and ways in which you want to group them. So it can be very handy for that. You can be in more than one place.


Paul Teske:
Okay, now I'm going to get into some tips about creating engaging videos. The first stop is to show your face. And oftentimes when people are creating videos, they'll put the PowerPoint up, and they'll go up in the corner in a teeny little box. Where research shows that if you're in front of your content and you're explaining it, it can help out a great deal with comprehension. Isn't that odd? The same goes for expressions and for gestures. So be authentic in your delivery, and don't be afraid to use your face and your hands.


Paul Teske:
All right. Next up, we have duration. I'm just kind of get in close to this for a little bit here. And a study was done around watching, and I think this was done with college students. But you'll notice that they watched for about six to nine minutes, and then it starts dropping. So what this clues us into is that shorter videos, and maybe more of them, can be hugely beneficial for students to comprehend and just in their general watching and motivation to watch. Now, this also connects with age. And there's some folks that say if you have a first grader, you'd want a one to two minute video. Second grade, two to three. Third grade, three to four minute. And all the way up to college and 20 minutes.


Paul Teske:
Now I know at university settings, which a lot of you folks are coming from, you'll record your whole session. The chances of that whole session being watched are fairly slim so you want to cut it down a little bit. Give them a bit of content and then a little activity to think about. A little bit of content and go back and forth that way. I know in previous work I did where we were creating videos for teachers, we limited ourselves at eight minutes. And it seemed to be, most of the time, I should say, it worked out pretty swell.


Paul Teske:
The other is to do storytelling and sort of metaphors. These act as cognitive anchors for students, and enliven a bit. And there's also some interplay there in meaning between words and the visuals that you have. Don't be afraid to do that. There's also cognitive load. And there's a thing called Miller's Law. He was a researcher back, I think, in the 20s who showed how much we could keep in our working memory at any one time. And he came up to seven plus or minus two things in storing things in your head and recalling them back. And this is how, at least, phone numbers in the US are structured. You'll notice that there's three digits and then four digits. And the reason is because people need to memorize those.


Paul Teske:
Now, if I said to you memorize these colors, right to left, both rows, and I'm going to give you two minutes, that would be a pretty daunting task. But notice this, if I say memorize this, these seven things, in two to three minutes, you'd be just fine in most likelihood. And that's what Miller's Law is. So take those ideas into what you're building for your students. And remember more is not always better. Okay.


Paul Teske:
The other is icon and images. Notice this text. It's a little flat, isn't it? Let's sprinkle a little energy in there with a few different images and icons. These can be helpful too in securing the points that you want to make. And when you start building your icons, you'll notice, I'm just going to get in close here, that it's good to sort of structure the visual in some way. Here we have have Congress in the US, and it's divided into two separate things. The arrows come down and show that. It's not just giving both those things. It's actually showing the relationship between them. And that can be helpful.


Paul Teske:
The next one is realia. And realia is basically props. And I brought a friend today. His name is Bruce from Saskatoon. Hi buddy. I'm Bruce. Thank you, Bruce for joining us. Do you have anything to say? No, I'm just buttinski. Okay. So use those props and there's all sorts of props. You can use your mug, if you'd want. I even use these things. I get behind them, and I'm like, okay. Hi everyone. Let's start. It's really fun to use props. And even when I'm working with university students, they love it. Little kids too. Don't be afraid to use them.


Paul Teske:
Okay, let's go on to the next. Finally, be the guide. And I have some tips here. Use the language of the classroom. If you're a K-12 teacher in the US, it's often like... Bruce needs a sweater. I see that Christine. Yes, he does. I often ask him. It's a little cold in Canada. So be the guide. And in the United States, oftentimes they have things like they call their students mathematicians or scholars. Use that language in the videos that you have. Also identify the purpose and the reason why for the different materials that you're giving them and content.


Paul Teske:
Then also be warm and engaging. This is dissolving the screen. You want to create the relationship as if you're sitting across the table from your students. Talk about thinking pauses. After you're done doing a concept, pause and think for just a second. And then finally up your personality by 120. Now I'm an introvert. And when I first started videoing, I was really meek. And I go in, and I would... Bring yourself out a little bit. It's all okay. People know you for who you are. And in a real classroom, they would see you that way anyway. So up it a little bit. Video makes you a little bit smaller. All right. And then I also know that folks are starting to use questions a lot. They're using tools like Edpuzzle and so forth. Some folks have their own strategies around that. Like every 90 seconds, ask a question. I'm not into that. I think you ask it at the beginning of a session to sort of spur some ideas about what they're about to watch. You might have one or two comprehension questions or something in the middle, and then something to cap it that relates or launches into the next bit. So these things can be incredibly helpful when you are trying to get them to comprehend their materials just a little more. All right. I'm going to hand it back to you, Sara, for the rest of it, or for the next little chunk.


Sara Ciskie:
Awesome. And I do have to say, this is the first webinar I've been in where I've seen the use of a puppet, and I desperately hope it's not the last because that made my entire week. Wonderful. So as we can see on this slide, having visual representation in real time is very crucial for students with hearing impairments, those who are deaf or heard of hearing, any language barriers, or learning disability. Accessibility in general is such a key focus for industries across the board, inclusive of education, and especially in education. Ensuring the ability to provide closed captions through lecture, referenceable texts, or imagery and animation through presentation, really assist all types of learners to grasp content. And fundamentally all learners benefit from having texts that goes along with the video.


Sara Ciskie:
As I mentioned earlier, virtual spaces can mean unexpected noise, or just generally unexpected interruptions. I know, speaking for me personally, my dog likes to bark at everyone and everything that comes even close to my driveway, inclusive of squirrels. And that means that I might miss a few seconds of what someone says. It's not that I don't want to be engaged. It's just a reflection of my circumstances. I'm glad to want to be engaged. It's just a reflection of my circumstances. I'm glad to see other people in the chat have the same issue with their animals.


Paul Teske:
They do.


Sara Ciskie:
It's just a reflection of my circumstances. And by having a text record of what was says, I don't have to rewind or ask anyone to repeat and I can just pick right back up where we left off. Next, the hybrid classroom has proven to be such a fun and unexpected challenge. So, when I'm conducting trainings we frequently have people who join both in person in the office, so in more of a traditional classroom setting and those who are dialing in and we really want to bring all learners into a collaborative environment, so that everyone feels connected even and especially if they're joining in remotely. Because what we don't want to happen is for those who are dialing in to feel removed from the learning environment because it can almost feel like if they're not connected or if they're not engaging, it can almost feel like you're watching a really long, really awkward movie, right? From a learner perspective. And that makes it really hard to stay engaged and stay involved.


Sara Ciskie:
So, this often means having more conversation or more question prompts and directly involving those who are joining remote to make sure that they still feel directly invited and feel like they're involved in the learning environment, the same as everyone. So, just to conclude and really bring all of this together, video and text can come together in really wonderful ways. I feel like Paul, you just showed us some really fantastic ways to take your video and make it more professional and also more engaging for all learners that are looking at this. I feel like the example of Congress was super, super concrete, right? So, instead of just listing things out in bullet points and I, myself am guilty of bullet point mania, right? Where every slide is just a series of points, but really showing how things are involved and how things come together and what the relationship is between these concepts as opposed to just a list of things out.


Sara Ciskie:
So, by having really involved and really engaging video and text that goes along with it, it can create a more inclusive and more engaging learning environment than either would really do alone. And I love the idea of having accurate, high quality text record or transcripts, close captions that make video inclusive and accessible for all learners who are involved. And that last bullet point I really want to hit home too, creating video that maintains an instructional, cognitive and social presence, which were concepts that I was not familiar with before I met you, Paul.


Paul Teske:
Glad I taught something.


Sara Ciskie:
Absolutely awesome. So Paul, I'm going to hand it over to you for the next slide.


Paul Teske:
Sure. So, Prezi does offer some free Prezi EDU Plus accounts. If you sign up for the basic, you can get upgraded. I believe it was put in the chat the link or in an email that went out to you, but take advantage of that. It's a great tool, I've been using Prezi for years and it's only gotten better, especially for the video stuff that you're doing with students. It's invaluable, it really is. Okay. Then it's time for questions. What sort questions do we have from the crowd?


Sara Ciskie:
Oh man, there's a lot of exciting stuff here. I saw a couple of questions come in through the Q&A. Just as a housekeeping item, this presentation, the video, and a transcript will be sent out to everyone afterwards. It will be going out later this week. So, if you have to drop or if you have to go out a little bit early, no worries whatsoever. You will have the full recording in your inbox soon.


Paul Teske:
Great. What questions do we have here?


Sara Ciskie:
I think the first one I see in here I think is to you, Paul.


Paul Teske:
Yes. Is that the one you're talking about? I'd love to do this kind of visual presentation, is there a tutorial to do just to learn how to do it I guess, is that what you're asking? Yes, there is. In fact, we just got done creating the Prezi Educator Certification Program. I created them. I think it's four courses, plus there's also a training module. And if you didn't want to go through that, we also have just a series of libraries of videos of how to use the platform. In the Certification Program, however, I use pedagogy in with the use of it, which I think is helpful and gives you a nice foundation. But either way, just go to Prezi tutorials and on Prezi you'll see a bunch of them. Vince makes great ones, so that should help you out quite a bit.


Sara Ciskie:
Awesome.


Paul Teske:
What else do we have here?


Sara Ciskie:
And then I see a question here, as it relates to video to support instruction, why is it important to have the teachers face on screen? Won't that distract from the content?


Paul Teske:
Well that's an interesting concept and I know some people like to strip things away from that to really focus on it. But no I mean does your face impede the meaning of content when you're there face to face? I'm not sure it does. I think what it does is it adds personality and gives you a personal connection with the students and students need that personal connections with their teachers. Research shows that the better connection they have with the teacher, the better they do in their classrooms and having a face there if the face is friendly, you don't want a big mean face up there, right? You want to come off as being warm and generative with them. And once you do that, that's how you build that connection, which leads to them comprehending more. The more they're at ease with the content and in their brains the neuroscience also shows that they're more apt to be receptive to whatever you're talking about from just a motivational standpoint, but also from a learning and comprehension standpoint. Hey, what else do we have?


Sara Ciskie:
I see here. Oh, we may have answered this question in the chat. So, forgive me if this completely just glossed over Sara, can you use Prezi Video in Microsoft Teams and Google Meet as well?


Paul Teske:
You can indeed. You can use them there very easily. Yeah. It connects right in, there's a video conferencing button. So, after you've created your Prezi, what you end up doing is you then open up your video conference and you can load it up directly in there. You just have to pick which one you want and it load write up into whatever tool you're using. It's very seamless, recent improvements to the program have made it even easier than it was in the past. I'm shocked that it just pops up in there but again, when you're designing, make sure you have some room for your face. I've seen all sorts of Prezis that people do where they don't leave room for their face and they're covered up by all these little circles and topics and then they're peeking behind their content and that is distracting. That's really distracting. Okay.


Sara Ciskie:
Totally. Oh, we had one question about what is Rev. So, I hope you don't mind if I field that one.


Paul Teske:
Go ahead.


Sara Ciskie:
So, Rev is the leader in speech to text. So, we want to make the spoken word accessible to everyone. So, we provide human and machine generated transcripts, both post productions, so we can transcribe and add closed captions to files that already exist. And we also have some real time services, which powers things like we have right now with the Zoom Live Captions, which I think is really, really cool. Oh, I love this question. I think this is something Paul, you and I can both probably field. What strategies do you recommend to motivate students' participation in class?


Paul Teske:
That is interesting and I think it also piggybacks on another one around online facilitation. There's certain things that I do and I think my students kind of like my classes. I have brain breaks where they flush the chemicals, the bad chemicals out of their brain and bring it back in. But I also start with the check and connect, which grounds people. You get to know sort of on a formative assessment level where they're coming to class and you can sort of be really responsive to that. Oftentimes I'll ask a question we all go around now. Sometimes that's hard to do when you have a hundred, but use the chat for that. Use a Waterfall chat, I love that where you say don't hit send yet and everyone types in their response and then you send, and then you skip the stream and you can go through it.


Paul Teske:
And you sort of act like a radio announcer, looking at the different pieces that are coming in, calling different folks out and say, "do you want to say a little bit more about that? I'd like to hear a little bit more" and just having that sort of connection with them upfront can really settle them into their learning. There's some other things too around the scaffolding of group work and the scaffolding of discussions, Prezi has some great videos from the National Teacher of the Year from 2010 or 2011, Sarah Brown Wessling, where she talks about how to engage your student online and how to build up the courage really in a lot of cases to participate in that group work online as well as to have discussions. So, it might start with instead of asking, okay, everyone, what do you think of blah and expect everyone to work.


Paul Teske:
You might want to scaffold in giving the hand raising or the emoticons that come up first. The next might be leveling up to the chat where their names are a little bit more attached to it and then slowly bringing them in. I also am a big fan of common spaces in which they can work. So, in those chat rooms, I give roles even when I'm working with adults. I want you to be the recorder, I want you to be the facilitator, I want you to be the timekeeper, make that very clear. As well as a centering task and often times I use Google for that and that can be really helpful as well. So, those are just a few that I can think of off the top of my head. I probably have a bunch more. Sara, what do you have?


Sara Ciskie:
No, I would echo what you said around getting everyone involved and just getting everyone speaking at the start of a session can just really get the juices going and also away some of the fear of that unmute button, right? Just by getting that first utterance, just getting that-

Sara Ciskie:
... Button, right? Just by getting that first utterance, just getting that first spoken word out there, even if it's just a silly question, for Austin, all of us think about food all the time here. So, a question I often ask is, "What's your favorite TexMex restaurant in Austin? Or, what's your favorite food to eat?" Little things that everyone probably has some opinion on, that just gets them engaged and gets them involved. And as much as possible, trying to understand what it is that your learners care about, what topics that they care about. And in some way, bringing analogies that relate to what their current lived experiences are, as opposed to bringing an analogy to the table that might work for you, but not for the learners. I was given a very rude awakening when I made an analogy to the movie The Matrix, only to learn that none of my learners had seen the film, The Matrix. So lessons learned the hard way, ladies and gentlemen.


Paul Teske:
Yeah. The one that I did last night is, I teach a tech integration class and we're unpacking videos of what make a good instructional video. And if there were more time, I would've done this with you all too, where I bring up from the golden age of television, I bring up Julia Child's flipping a potato pancake that fails. And they loved it. The thing is, is you can learn so much from watching the masters of that work and understanding how to build community and relationships when they're not in the room with you. And I can tell you just on the side here, when I was working with teachers in a district, there was one who stepped up and said, "I'm going to create the videos for the department."


Paul Teske:
Because nobody else wanted to. They were afraid to watch themselves and put themselves on video. Well, she was their teacher that she provided the videos throughout the year. And at the end of the year, when the students came in to pick up their stuff, who do you think they gravitated to in the long lineup of teachers? The one that was on the video, that's who they built the relationship with. So it's an incredibly powerful medium, and I would suggest folks use it to the best of your advantage. Anyway, anything else there?


Sara Ciskie:
I love that. I love that. We have a couple of other questions around software that Prezi is compatible with. So I see a question about Moodle. Is it possible to embed a Prezi presentation into Moodle? And then I also see a question, can it be embedded to ALA as you can for YouTube? So potentially, any thoughts on those two platforms? I know that I've heard Moodle used a lot.


Paul Teske:
Right. Moodle, I believe you can. There's an embed code. You just grab that and however Moodle grabs those embed codes is the way that you do that. I've never used Moodle, so I'm not sure exactly how they go about doing that. But the embed code is produced by Prezi. And I'm imagining that you can put that in there. Insofar as YouTube, the way that I handle it is I download my videos and then upload them into my private channels. And what's nice about that is it gives you a YouTube link that's highly usable. Now, Prezi also has a link too. There's something about the portability of YouTube sometimes that is more compatible with some other tools. But once in a while, I do that. And then also for Spanish translation, because I often work with bilingual audiences.


Sara Ciskie:
That's wonderful. I think just looking at the time we have time for about one or two more questions. And thank you so much to everyone who's been chiming in. It's not very fun to teach to an unengaged classroom. It's much the same with webinars. So we love to see all this engagement. So thanks to everyone for all the questions. I'm sorry that we don't have all the time to get to every single one of them, but a couple others that we have here. I think this one, particularly since this whole session is around the hybrid environment, I'd like to open this question up. Could you explain more about the use of Prezi video for hybrid meetings? I find it particularly difficult to stay engaged with both worlds and provide good class offline while having a good video picture for those online. I can't look into the camera all the time when I teach.


Paul Teske:
So it sounds like you're in a case where you're recording your sessions live and that is the recording that you're doing. And that is incredibly difficult. The way that I would do it is plan, plan, plan. So you would have to say similar to when you're doing a cast, like a play, you got to say, "Okay, this section, I'm going to talk directly into the camera with." And I'm going to tell the class that I'm doing that in order to gauge the others. And then go outside of yourself and say, "Now class, I'm going to be talking to the others, so I may not be looking directly at you." But be strategic in how you're doing that and plot it out. That's the only thing you can do. I think those situations are incredibly hard. And generally when you have folks that are doing that sort of thing in a professional sense, they have a crew. It's just you. So you do have to plan a little bit more in situations like that.


Sara Ciskie:
Absolutely. I would add too that most often is students understand limitations, right? They see the situation and they know that you can't be addressing everyone all the time, but I love the idea of just giving the context and addressing who you're addressing and just helping direct that way. I love that. So I think we have time for one more question. First of all, someone said they used Rev for focus groups transcription. It was super accurate. So thank you for the compliment, Mara. Awesome. Let's see, Paul, do you want to pick one of the questions? I am genuinely not a good selector.


Paul Teske:
I know, I'm reading through this going, "Oh."


Sara Ciskie:
There's so many.


Paul Teske:
I think the one about learning difficulties and diverse audiences is interesting. And any suggestions, I'm thinking just about just video in general, and this has to deal with the differentiation comment that I made earlier is that if you're making videos for various audiences, you have that ability to reach students in different ways. So if you know you're going to have students, let's say, who are challenged in speaking English or just newcomers, you might have a transcript number one, but also you might have translation services also. And YouTube does translation as part of it and that can be very handy. And I use that one all the time. The other is, if you have folks at varying levels, you don't necessarily need to call out what level they are and the title of the video, like beginner, intermediate, and advanced, unless everyone knows what they're in for.


Paul Teske:
Because nobody really likes to be called out for being a beginner sometimes, especially if you're all coming in at the same level. So you might not do level one, two and three, but rather just give it some sort of nomenclature with the, "Here's our set. And I want you to go to this set of videos and this." That way, you're giving them different sets of videos, but they can also have a collective conversation at the same time. And that's important to feel included in the conversation, not marginalized as not being up to snuff, right? The others are talking at this level, they're reading this stuff and I'm not getting it. Ah. What you want to do is provide them with content at different approachability angles, and then bring them together to have collective conversations. So, it's all about being inclusive. Okay.


Sara Ciskie:
Well, I think that's all that we have time for. I wish that we could literally stay here and talk all day. That would genuinely make my day. But thanks so much to everyone for all of your participation and engagement. We really appreciate you spending some time with us here today.